Antiquities as Souvenirs in the First World War
Forgan Smith (building 1), The University of Queensland, St Lucia
Venue: Forgan Smith (building 1), The University of Queensland, St Lucia.

Non-members are welcome. A donation of $10 per person includes entry in the lucky door prize and afternoon tea.

The Military Significance of Venus in the Late Republic

The Roman goddess Venus is well recognised for her influence over love, sex, and beauty. However, she also possessed significant military power, which became the subject of intense political competition in the Late Republic. Gnaeus Pompey and Julius Caesar both engaged in this dialogue of competition over Venus’ favour, and sought to prove her patronage over their individual interests. The ideal means to achieve this was through building projects, which could explicitly evoke her martial attributes, and advertise a personal connection with the goddess on a large public scale.

Antiquities as Souvenirs in the First World War

During World War I Australian service personnel souvenired antiquities, many of which survive today in both public and private hands. The most representative public collection of these are located in the Australian War Memorial, Canberra. In this presentation Mr Donaldson will describe what types of artefacts were souvenired; how were they acquired and what role they fulfil in the War Memorial's collection.